LASER Helping travellers keep powerbank in carry-ons

Posted by admin 27/10/2017 0 Comment(s) Press,

Laser helping travellers keep powerbank in carry-ons

I'm sure we have all noticed the little red battery icon in the corner of our mobile phone. That is when we turn to plan J – switch to low battery mode, turn down the brightness and use airplane mode. Plan B would be to use a powerbank, but despite anyone efforts, where do we find the perfect travel companion?

 

Australian-owned electronics company, LASER, announced that it will be listing watt hours on its new range of powerbanks, the first company in Australia to do so. The industry-first is aimed at assisting Australian travellers heading overseas, with security restrictions varying and regularly changing among countries and airlines globally.

 

It was a question on every travelers mind, are powerbanks allowed on planes?

 

Yes, you can fly with most powerbanks – however be sure to research when flying with any carrier. Powerbanks with lithium-ion batteries need to be stored in carry-on luggage. Watt-Hours is the consistent measurement used by government bodies and airlines to assess whether specific consumer technology can be carried on board planes. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority states that batteries that power phones, laptops and cameras usually fall under the 101-watt-hour limit[1].

 

This latest addition to both the product range and its packaging will assist both LASER and its retailers in educating consumers on what can and can’t be taken on board, thereby minimising the chance of having a device confiscated when going through security into the future.

 

“Airlines including Qantas[2], Virgin and Cathay Pacific have recently added specific details around power banks and spare batteries, which states that passengers cannot carry on items that exceed 101 watt-hours of power. These airlines can start enforcing these policies whenever they so choose, which seems more and more likely given the many consumers who have given us feedback from their own travel experiences around the world,” said Chris Lau, Managing Director of LASER.

 

As many Australian power banks are marketed by milliampere hours (mAh), consumers need to understand these new regulations to avoid the disappointment of having to part with your devices and power banks at security.

 

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